Aerie…

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This eagle’s nest (aerie) is about 60 feet up in a tall tree. The nest is huge, at least 4 feet in diameter. In order to get an angle which allowed me to see the eaglet pop his head up I had to get about 200 yards away. The photo is extremely zoomed in so is not really sharp. This nest is on the Arkansas River near Tulsa.

Update: This is not really a young eagle, but actually one of the parents probably tending an egg. Here is a video which shows the same nest with the mom and dad changing places.

Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)…

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This is one of the most numerous birds in North America. They use complex songs to declare their territory and to identify neighboring song sparrows as opposed to strangers.

Bald Eagle…

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I’ve been stalking this eagle off and on for a few days. It is tough to get close enough for a really decent shot…this is the best so far. When it gets a little warmer, I’ll go out and sit still on a stump for a few hours in hopes for a better photo. This bird is probably a winter migrator as we normally don’t see any around here. Such a majestic creature.

House Finch…

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He loves sunflower seeds. The industrial strength beak is perfect for cracking seeds. His girlfriend is behind, being shy.

American Kestrel (Falco sparverius)…

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The Kestrel, sometimes known as the Sparrow Hawk, is the smallest falcon in North America. It will sit on a high wire or fence waiting to prey on grasshoppers, lizards, mice and other small birds. It’s quite often seen along road sides, not often bothered by traffic unless you stop to take a photo. This picture doesn’t do it justice, as the back side is really quite colorful.

Hold the gravy…

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I had some leftover biscuits which the Red-bellied woodpeckers really went for. This one would keep flying off with pieces which he would poke into the crevices of trees, presumedly to feed on later when times get hard.

Harlan’s Hawk…

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I believe this is a Harlan’s Hawk, due to its coloration. Some experts consider this to be a sub-species of the Red-tailed Hawk, others think it is a separate species. First described by John James Audubon in 1829. He referred to it as Falco Harlani (after R. Harlan, a physician and naturalist).

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